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THE HEALTHY WOMEN COUNSELING GUIDE (HWCG) IN THE PHILIPPINES (PHASE 1)
Project Director/Coordinator: Celeste Maria V. Condor
Funding Agency:        World Health Organization

The main objective of the HWCG is the improvement of Filipino women’s lives and that of their families through participatory approaches in the preparation of gender-sensitive and culturally-appropriate materials and messages for dissemination. The outputs of the project include the production of local radio presentations, video clips, street plays and various popular illustrated materials such as comic books and calendars.

Key words: lives of Filipino women, participatory approaches to health counseling, gender-sensitivity

 

HEALTH CARE FINANCING SYSTEM IN SURIGAO DEL NORTE
Project Director:          Cristela Goce-Dakila
Funding Agency:        Hassall and Associates PTY, Ltd. Phils.

The main objective of the study was to develop and adapt financing strategies and options for the over-all health delivery system of the provision.  A situation analysis was done to draw out the problem areas in which a health financing design is needed.   This situation analysis involved focus group discussions for gathering clients’ perspectives and key informant interviews for gathering providers’ perspectives.   The focus group discussions were conducted in 12 municipalities of Surigao del Norte.

The study recommended: (1) Establishing an integrated and comprehensive network of health facilities of varying capabilities, and prioritization of health services; (2) Re-prioritizing health services; (3) Implementing inter-LGU cost-sharing mechanisms; (4) Improving and implementing a health insurance scheme, specifically the social insurance scheme under the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation and community-based health insurance schemes like the “tampuhay” and the SURIMAA.  Exploring ways of reducing banking sector interest charges; and (5) Instituting reforms at the provincial level by: asserting the province’s share of the devolution equalization fund to get a bigger share of the cooperative pharmacy and IRA fees; tapping sources of provincial government funds other than the IRA allotment, such as mining fees and the national wealth tax; cost-recovery mechanisms such as procuring drugs in bulk quantities, charging fees for usage of medical supplies in the core referral hospital, and charging consultation fees for off-office hours consultation and for non-emergency cases.

Key words: health delivery systems, financing strategies and options, cost-sharing mechanisms, health insurance scheme, Surigao del Norte

 

INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM AT THE LGU-MANAGED HEALTH FACILITIES: FOCUS ON THE FAMILY PLANNING PROVISION (QUALITY OF CARE PRACTICUM ON POPULATION AND HEALTH, PHASE 2)
Project Director:          Exaltacion E. Lamberte
Funding Agency:        United States Agency for International Development

The Institutionalization of Quality Assurance Program Project (IQAPP) was a sequel to the successful Quality of Care Assessment Capacity Building Project (Research Practicum on Population and Health, Phase 1).   The IQAPP was a response to the recommendations of Phase 1 participants to: (a) orient health-care providers on the Principles of Quality Assurance (QA), and (b) carry out capacity-building activities related to the institutionalization of quality-improvement initiatives at the local health facilities.

As a program, the IQAPP had macro-level and micro-level components.   The macro-level component, especially the training and capacity-building activities, yielded positive results.   Through the IQAPP, the Sentrong Sigla Movement was introduced in key areas of the country.   A compilation of training modules, an accompanying facilitator’s guide, and Sentrong Sigla assessment tools (with the DOH team) have been completed.   Moreover, the basic training and capacity-building activities were reported to have resulted in the participants’ increased knowledge and skills for implementing QA intervention, as well as an increased appreciation of the standard assessment for health facilities of the family planning program service provision. Operations/action research at the Baguio Health Department (BHD) and at the pilot health facilities were undertaken for the micro-level components.

Recommendations were:  (a) Continuation of capacity-building activities and QA programs in both public and private health sectors, local health organizations, and non-government organizations, especially in economically and socially disadvantaged areas.   These capacity-building activities and QA programs would contribute to a culture of quality among health service providers.  (b) Expanding the research projects to other cities to test the validity of the study’s conclusions, and to determine sustainable mechanisms for integrating quality assurance in the routine activities of health facilities and of the local health department.

Key words: Sentrong Sigla movement, family planning, quality assurance programs, health facilities, operations/action research

 

EXPANDING THE DELIVERY OF FAMILY PLANNING AND MATERNAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR: A LOOK AT THE PROFILE OF FP CLIENTS OF WELL-FAMILY MIDWIFE CLINICS
Project Director:          Exaltacion E. Lamberte
Funding Agency:        John Snow Research and Training Institute, Inc.

This study looked at the profile of the clients of the Well-Family Midwife Clinics (WFMC) supervised by midwives who underwent training conducted by the John Snow Institute (JSI) and partner NGOs from 1997 to April 1998.   The profiling data describe the characteristics of family planning clients served by the cooperating midwives and are useful in planning and mapping out strategies for expanding the WFMC.   The study gathered information from the clinics of 51 randomly chosen midwives, covering a total of 7,687 clients.

Recommendations were: (a) Increasing the capacity of the clinics to reach women who belong to much better socioeconomic groups in the community;  (b) Increasing efforts to encourage very young women to make use of the clinic’s services;  (c) Increasing the coordination and collaboration between the private clinics (including WFMCs) and the city or rural health centers to encourage those who can afford and those who want prompt and regular FP service to go to private clinics/WFMC and, thus, reduce the number of users of public health facilities;  (d) Pro-actively recruiting more women of reproductive age to use family planning;  and (e) Buying supplies and commodities in big bulk in order to maintain the provision of services or commodities at lower and affordable prices.

Key words: family planning, midwife clinics, city and rural health centers, public health facilities

 

DATA-BASE AND POPULATION ESTIMATION OF STREET CHILDREN/
OURS TO PROTECT OUR STREET CHILDREN

Project Director:          Exaltacion E. Lamberte
Funding Agency:        United Nations Children's Fund

This study specifically focused on the “highly visible children on the streets,” otherwise known as the “target priority group” of street children needing utmost attention.   Out of 246,011 street children, 20 per cent are indicated to be “highly visible on the streets,” a group needing priority action. This segment of street children also comprises 1.61% of the urban young population aged 0-17 years. Based on estimates made from the 22 cities covered, the national estimates for highly visible children on the streets in the country ranges from 45,000 (downside) to 50,000 (high side).

Majority of the children covered in the study were located in barangays/areas outside of their place of residence. About 25 percent are residing in cities outside or different from the city in which they were located, implying the importance of a metropolitan approach in addressing the problem on street children.  Children stake out in different locations, and the predominant ones were streets (36.5%), market (8%) and worship/recreation areas (12.4%).  In terms of visibility on the streets, children stay on the streets for an average of nine (9) hours within a day, and the greatest number of them is in Metro Manila. Based on previous studies, one could surmise that the number of children who actually stay and live on the streets has increased (from the reported 5% of the previous studies to 8% of the present research). Extent of visibility on the streets is significantly explained by age, gender, participation in schooling, living arrangement, frequency of going home, assistance extended by street educators/workers, and child’s knowledge of existence of organizations/agencies providing assistance.

The study recommended a review, examination, and rethinking of the strategies adopted by “street-based” interventions and programs, given the findings that individuals extending assistance increases visibility and the amount of time spent by children on the streets.

Key words: street children, young urban population, street educators/workers, “street-based” interventions, organizations/agencies extending assistance

 

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PRIMARY HEALTH CARE (PHC) RESOURCE CENTER AND EVALUATION OF PHC
Project Director:          Exaltacion E. Lamberte
Funding Agency:        Department of Health (through the Community Health Service)

The project aimed to set up a databank and a system that would allow for an institutionalized and sustained monitoring and evaluation of the performance of local government units in primary health care. The Department of Health was to be the main user of the system.  It sought to generate and process information on PHC from various sources such as academe, non-government organizations, and research institutions.

Key words: primary health care, information generation, databank, performance monitoring and evaluation, Department of Health

 

SUPPORT TO PARTICIPATE IN A WORLDWIDE COMPARATIVE RESEARCH PROJECT ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CIVIL SOCIETY AND GOVERNANCE
Project Director:          Francisco A. Magno
Funding Agency:        The Ford Foundation

The passage of the Local Government Code in 1991 provided the impetus for greater openness toward collaborative work between local government units (LGUs) and civil society.  Since the implementation of the Code, a host of innovative measures and capacity-building efforts were undertaken in enhancing public-private partnerships at the local level.

The main objective of the research was to identify ways in which interactions between civil society and government agencies lead to more responsive, effective, transparent, and accountable governance in a variety of contexts.  The project seeks to arrive at an understanding of how these interactions may reduce poverty, inequality, and social exclusion.

Key areas that served as the foci of the study included poverty alleviation, agrarian reform communities and barangay governance, housing for the poor, political decentralization, local environmental governance, local peace zones, enhancing women’s access to credit, education for life and governance, monitoring national compliance with Agenda 21, and promoting indigenous peoples’ rights.  Case studies were prepared for each of these areas.  The case studies highlighted civil society’s role in the implementation of programs and projects in each key area, the manner of cooperation between the LGUs and civil society, and the extent and quality of civil society participation.  They also determined whether or not the participation of civil society enhances the attainment of the project goals.

Key words: civil society, Local Government Code, poverty alleviation, housing for the poor, social exclusion

 

TOWARDS THE INTEGRATION OF DOMESTIC/FAMILY VIOLENCE ISSUES IN THE CURRICULA OF HEALTH TRAINING INSTITUTIONS: PILOT STUDIES AT THE COLLEGE OF NURSING IN SILLIMAN UNIVERSITY, CEBU DOCTORS’ COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, AND THE ZAMBOANGA MEDICAL SCHOOL FOUNDATION, INC.
Project Director : Pilar Ramos-Jimenez
Funding Agency: Commission on Higher Education

The integration of domestic/family violence issues in the nursing and medicine curricula is seen as a means to help develop future practitioners to deal adequately with survivors of violence in the family/domestic set-up. The project addresses the acute need of equipping health sector personnel with the values, skills, and competencies required for comprehensively responding to cases related to such forms of violence.

Key words: domestic/family violence, nursing and medicine curricula, health sector personnel

 

SUPPORT FOR ACTION RESEARCH ON MALES' PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER AND FAMILY VIOLENCE
Project Director:          Romeo B. Lee
Funding Agency:        The Ford Foundation

The Filipino Men and Domestic Violence Project (MENDOV) was meant to address the question: If men are often the sources of physical violence, why are they excluded from domestic violence programs?    The project was carried out for 24 months (August 1998–July 2000) in the cities of Davao and Iloilo and in adjoining rural communities.  Originally planned as a purely research undertaking, the project’s scope was widened to include a social intervention component.   The research component took 10 months of the project’s two-year duration.  It sought to understand the context of men’s roles as sources of violent behavior.   It investigated men’s perceptions, attitudes, experiences, and feelings concerning marriage, family life, interpersonal conflict and violence, and behavioral change.  The project’s social intervention component was completed in five months.   The intervention involved a month-long cycle of workshops and a follow-up visit to men’s communities and work places three weeks after the workshops.

It was recommended that program implementers seriously consider the “ecological theory to men’s violence” to address the problem of violence.   The “ecological theory to men’s violence” recognizes that society as a macro-system has a powerful and large-scale influence in the perpetuation of domestic violence.   The macro-system consists of the sub-systems of family, religion, politics, business, medicine, law, mass media, and education.   In each sub-system, individuals exist in a hierarchy of formal and informal social positions.   Program implementers can use the systemic approach to examine these sub-systems and their core stakeholders, and to understand how these can be mobilized for domestic violence prevention.

Key words: Filipino men, domestic violence programs, behavior change, social interventions, “ecological theory to men’s violence”


 

 

 

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