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POLICY MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROJECT
Project Director:          Antonio Pedro, Jr.
Funding Agency:        Benefactor

The project primarily aimed to provide government officials with policy analysis, evaluation, and recommendations in aid of policy formulation.

The project team produced daily analysis and evaluation of relevant issues for the day, as well as weekly analysis and evaluation of pertinent policy issues.   Issues tackled were poverty alleviation, the power reform bill, solid waste management, the peace process, law enforcement and criminality, corruption, labor and overseas Filipino workers, and the coco levy bill.    The issues were culled from the major dailies and broad sheets.

Key words: policy formulation, poverty alleviation, power reform, solid waste management, law enforcement, overseas Filipino workers

 

THE HEALTHY WOMEN COUNSELING GUIDE IN THE PHILIPPINES (PHASE 2)
Project Director:          Celeste Maria V. Condor
Funding Agency:        UNDP/World Bank/World Health Organization Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases and the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development

The Healthy Women Counselling Guide (HWCG) is a low-cost, practical and effective health communication tool on malaria.   It addresses the health needs of rural women and of their families through a participatory approach and through culturally-appropriate communication strategies.   Ipilan in Brooke’s Point and Inogbong in Batangas (both in Palawan), which have high incidences of malaria, were chosen as study sites.   Key informant interviews, focus group discussions, and a household survey were utilized to gain the necessary baseline information.   The residents were very familiar with malaria; however, incorrect health beliefs and practices about it persist.

To correct these beliefs and practices and to reinforce appropriate health behaviors, an illustrated calendar, six comic books, and video and radio materials were disseminated from February 2000 to January 2001.   Dissemination consisted of showing the video materials, airing the radio programs, and sharing the story lines and messages from the calendar and comic books.  After these activities, a teaching session was conducted.   Formative evaluation and monitoring of the effects of the participatory intervention were done quarterly, and a summative evaluation was done in February 2001.   Collation and analyses of data were performed afterwards.

Key words: malaria, health communication, rural women, culturally-appropriate strategies, participatory intervention, Palawan

 

TRAINING COURSE ON CONFLICT MANAGEMENT AND RESOLUTION
Project Director:          Francisco A. Magno
Funding Agency:        The Philippine-Australia Short-Term Training (PASTT) Program

This project was a customized training course on Conflict Management and Resolution covering the core values, knowledge, and skills in the areas of conflict management and action research methodology.

The training consisted of two components.   Component 1 introduced participants to conflict resolution concepts, processes, models, and skills.   The skills included negotiation skills, analysis of conflict resolution styles, conflict mapping, and principles of facilitation.

Component 2 explored how conflict resolution concepts and skills can be applied in local and international contexts.   The component included an action research visit to Australia and New Zealand.   Action research as a method for studying conflict was introduced together with conflict transformation, and gender analysis and conflict.   Another activity of Component 2 was the conduct of an international seminar which was participated in by guests from government, non-government, and academic organizations.

Component 2 also included discussions about innovative policy formulation and implementation of post-conflict reconstruction and rehabilitation, and crisis management and long-term peace building.   Recommendations based on the lessons learned from case reports and from the participants’ experiences were also formulated for the National Program for Unification and Development Council.

Key words: conflict management and resolution, action research, negotiation skills, principals of facilitation, peace building

 

SUPPORT FOR DOCUMENTATION AND ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT
OF TRAINING FOR PARTICIPATORY LOCAL GOVERNANCE

Project Director:          Francisco A. Magno
Funding Agency:        The Ford Foundation

The project aimed to document and assess the impact of the Barangay Training and Management (Batman) Project, conducted by the Barangay-Bayan Governance Consortium (BBGC), an alliance of non-government organizations, on the quality of participatory governance and community development in selected project sites.  The main concern was to determine whether there is a marked improvement in local democracy and development resulting from interventions made through the Batman Project.

The project utilized a paired-comparison approach in assessing the impact of the Batman intervention.  First, barangays in which there exist intensive Batman interventions (Batman barangays) are compared with barangays with similar socio-economic characteristics but with no interventions from the BBGC (non-Batman barangays).  Second, the case study sites were spread across the country to be able to assess the impacts of Batman in various local conditions and characteristics.

Consultative meetings. A series of consultative meetings with key implementors of the project was organized from January to July 2001. Meetings were also held with various NGOs to identify partners who will undertake the research.

Case studies. Fourteen case study sites were identified across the country:  Four in Luzon, six in Visayas, and four in Mindanao.  The research made use of three main criteria to evaluate the impacts on local democracy and local development:   Good governance at the barangay level; empowerment of barangay leaders and members; and improvements in the quality of life.

Regional workshops. Regional workshops for Mindanao and Visayas were conducted to generate discussions on the initial findings of the research.  The workshops served as a venue for the different stakeholders to validate the various issues and challenges that surfaced during the preliminary assessment of the project. 

Research dissemination. Dr. Magno presented the preliminary findings of the research in September 2002 at the University of Reading and at the Institute of Development Studies. A national conference was also organized to discuss the lessons and insights gained on local participatory governance.

Key words: participatory governance and community development, local democracy, barangay leaders’ empowerment

 

MANAGING EFFECTIVE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
Project Director:          Francisco A. Magno
Funding Agency:        The Philippine-Australia Short-Term Training (PASTT) Program

The Social Development Research Center and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) in Australia collaborated in conducting a training seminar entitled “Managing Social Development Projects.”

The seminar had two parts.   Part I included lectures and discussions on the different aspects of project development and management, evaluation, as well as quality standard systems and efficient training implementation.   Part II included a training component in Melbourne, Australia, exposure to various Australian social development projects, and the finalization of a training manual.

Attending the seminar were 17 selected participants from various government units and non-government organizations involved in the nationwide “Food for Work” project of the Department of Interior and Local Government.

Key words: social development projects, training seminars, quality standard systems, “Food for Work” project

 

PROMOTING CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
Project Director:          Francisco A. Magno
Funding Agency:        John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

This was the Philippine component of the research project entitled “The Political Economy of Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility (CSER) in Developing Countries.”  The project was coordinated by Dr. Peter Utting of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development. The study sought to identify the voluntary initiatives of corporations in developing countries and their impacts on the environment, social development, and labor conditions.  It also analyzed the main forces, actors, pressures, policies, and incentives that encourage firms to improve their social and environmental performance. The thrusts of the project were a) to conduct a macro-level analysis of the political economy of corporate social responsibility, b) to conduct a sectoral analysis, and c) to examine the extent to which voluntary initiatives have been adopted by companies and their effectiveness.

A workshop among the case study researchers was conducted in order to discuss research design and methodology, research instruments, and project management concerns.  Participants were noted in their respective fields and were based in the regions in which they would conduct their research.  The following companies were chosen for in-depth case studies:  Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Nestlé Philippines, Bayer, Rio Tinto and Marcopper mining companies, and Dole.

SDRC hosted the second meeting of the corporate social and environmental responsibility project.  The meeting was participated in by researchers and specialists based in Johannesburg, New Delhi, Geneva, Mexico City, and Manila. During the meeting, the project directors presented their paper on the political economy of corporate social responsibility of their respective countries.  Afterwards, the participants conducted plant visits at Ford Motors and Coca-Cola Bottling Company, both located in the province of Laguna, in order to examine the social and environmental performance and initiatives of these companies.

Key words: corporate social and environmental responsibility, developing countries, political economy, voluntary initiatives

 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR THE PRODUCTION OF THE ANCESTRAL DOMAIN MANAGEMENT PLANNING (ADMP)-NON TIMBER FOREST PRODUCT (NTFP) Booklet
Project Director:          Ma. Victoria Pilar Sabban
Funding Agency:        Non-Timber Forest Products Exchange Programme

Notwithstanding favorable State policies, indigenous groups continue to face conflicts over the use and protection of resources within their ancestral domain. This study sought to help disseminate the experiences of Palawan tribes to other indigenous groups, by documenting these experiences in an Ancestral Domain Management Planning booklet. The material is to serve as a medium for sharing lessons from Philippine indigenous groups in using non-timber forest products.

More specifically, the booklet shares with other indigenous groups the Philippines/Palawan experiences in a) securing a Certificate of Ancestral Domain Claim, b) delineating ancestral domain boundaries, c) planning for ancestral domain management, and d) using non-timber forest products within the domain; and provides tools for field workers of support groups to a) visually present the Palawan tribes’ experiences in ancestral domain management, b) assist other indigenous groups interested in the delineation of ancestral domain boundaries and planning for resource management, and c) understand basic policies that cover resource management within ancestral domain.

The ADMP material’s intended users include Philippine and Asian partners in the NTFP Task Force.

Key words: Indigenous peoples, ancestral domain, non-timber forest produces, Palawan tribes, resource management

 

ENABLING WOMEN FOR AN ACTIVE ROLE IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT:  A WOMEN, WORK AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
Project Director:          Myla A. Arcinas
Funding Agency:        International Federation of Catholic Universities

Adhering to the principle that the surest way to economic growth and overall development is by empowering women and investing in their capabilities (UNDP, 1996), the WWD Project was envisioned to create a more dynamic and empowered women’s sector towards development.  Three barangays (745, 753 and 754) from Zone 81 of the 5th District of Manila were chosen as partner-communities of the project.  Located within the vicinity of De La Salle University, these barangays were classified as the three least developed communities, and were host to the most economically marginalized families of the area.

The project aimed at identifying responsive and appropriate ways of empowering women in an urban poor community.  It sought to: a) provide a demographic, socio-economic, and anthropological situationer of the women in the host community; b) look at the perceptions of women regarding their status and role in the community; c) train and empower women from the host communities to enable them to become more economically productive, based on the ideals of community participation, self-help, and participatory development; and d) ascertain in a contextual manner the linkages among women’s status, human resource development, and work and development.

The project was guided by a process-oriented approach referred to as “Research-Action-Participation” (RAP). The anthropological principle of recognizing the members of the community as more knowledgeable in terms of “local realities” than outsiders enabled the systemization of the process.  The application of RAP to this project permitted strategies, paradigms, and methodological processes that are less rigid and more spontaneous to tailor-fit the situation.

The project consisted of four phases:  Phase I - Resource Mobilization and Social Preparation; Phase II - Continuing Capability Building and Livelihood Development; Phase III - Organizational Strengthening and Networking; and Phase IV - Enhancing and Sustaining.

Key words: women’s empowerment, urban poor communities, Research-Action-Participation (RAP), human resource development, capability and livelihood

 

ENHANCING PO-NGO PARTICIPATION IN NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR THE UPLAND NGO ASSISTANCE COMMITTEE (UNAC)
Project Directors:        Robert Salazar and  Ma. Victoria Pilar S. Iglesia
Funding Agency:        Upland NGO Assistance Committee (UNAC)

The research looked into the nature and extent of PO-NGO participation in natural resource management and the factors that may account for similarities and differences in outcomes.  These factors included:  a) policy environment at the national and local levels (policies as well as the structures and processes that shape them); b) contextual environment of communities, POs, NGOs, and agents of the bureaucracy in the course of their involvement in natural resources management; and c) interaction processes that characterize PO-NGO structures, strategies, systems, staff, shared values, skills, and management style.

Key words: natural resources management, policy environment, PO-NGO structures, agents of bureaucracy


 

 

 

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