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DOCUMENTATION OF THE PUNDASYON HANUNUO MANGYAN SCHOOL EXPERIENCE
Project Director:          Carmelita Quebengco
Funding Agency:        SDRC Special Fund for Studies on Poverty and Vulnerable Groups

In mid-1983 a project proposal was developed by the Integrated Research Center (IRC)—presently the Social Development Research Center—and the Graduate School of Arts, Education and Science (GSAES), in coordination with the Participatory Uplands Management Program (PUMP) of the IRC, with the aim of developing a relevant yet culturally appropriate elementary education program, the training of para-teachers, and the setting up of a system to ensure sustainability for a school for the Mangyans of Oriental Mindoro.

The study aimed to document and examine the outcome of the Pundasyon Hanunuo Mangyan School in terms of its three-pronged goal of developing a relevant yet culturally appropriate basic education program, training of para-teachers from the communities involved and establishing school farms to ensure sustainability for the school.  It adopted adopts a multi-method strategy, which included: 1) A review of existing statistical data about the Pundasyon Hanunuo Mangyan School, as well as those of the Department of Education’s district, division and national offices; 2) Key informant interviews (KIIs) of the officials of the Pundasyon Hanunuo Mangyan, Inc.; 3) Key informant interviews (KIIs) of the administrative officials of the Pundasyon Hanunuo Mangyan School; 4) Key informant interviews (KIIs) of the para-teachers of the Pundasyon Hanunuo Mangyan School; 5) Focus group discussions (FGDs) of the pupils of the various grade levels using FGD guide questions; and 6) A face-to-face interview of a sample of graduates of the school using a structured interview questionnaire.

The study covered the three (3) sitios of Umabang, Bailan and Amindang of Barangay Binli in the municipality of Bulalacao in the province of Oriental Mindoro.

Key words:  Pundasyon Hanunuo Mangayan School, Participatory Uplands Management Program, culturally appropriate basic education, Oriental Mindoro 

 

SYSTEM PRESIDENT’S POVERTY ALLEVIATION: ACTION RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION FOR PEOPLES’ ORGANIZATIONS MICRO-FINANCE INITIATIVE (PHASE 1)
Project Director:          Exaltacion E. Lamberte
Funding Agency:        DLSU President's Office and SDRC Poverty Studies Fund

The study aimed to find responsive and appropriate ways of undertaking poverty reduction initiatives in the communities of Barangay Paliparan, Dasmariñas, Cavite; Barangay Concepcion, Lumban, Laguna; and Barangays 745, 753, and 754, Singalong, Manila (for DLSU-Dasmariñas, DLS-College of St. Benilde, and DLSU-Manila, respectively), so as to assess the status of beneficiaries of the Caucus on Poverty Reduction (CPR) during the period 2003-2005. 

The study sought to: 1) provide a socio-demographic and economic situationer of the micro-finance partners of the different programs before and after program implementation; 2) look at the perceptions of the micro-finance partners of the different programs regarding their present status compared to that prior to the program implementation; 3) assess the training needs of the micro-finance partners to enable them to become more economically productive based on the ideals of community participation, self-help, and participatory development; 4) look into the implementation of the different programs relative to equity and gender concerns; and 5) look into the operation of the different programs, especially on the aspects of transparency and accountability.

The survey entailed interviewing fifty (50) partners each in the Business Skills Development Resource Centers (BSDRC) programs in Dasmariñas, Cavite, Lumban, Laguna, and Singalong, Manila, using a structured interview questionnaire.  In addition, a similar number of non-partners from the same areas were also interviewed using the same questionnaire to allow for comparison.  The sample partner-respondents were drawn randomly from the respective lists of the three programs, while the sample non-partner-respondents were drawn randomly from available barangay voters’ lists after removing the names of program partners.

Highlights of the baseline survey research are findings in the areas of Socio-Demographic and Housing Characteristics; Socio-Economic Characteristics; Savings and Credit System; Awareness of the Caucus on Poverty Reduction-Business Skills Development Resource Center (CPR-BSDRC) and its Operation; and Perceptions and Beliefs.

Key words: poverty reduction initiatives, micro-finance partners, community participation, equity and gender concerns

 

MAPPING OF MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH CAPACITY IN LOW AND MIDDLE INCOME (LAMI) COUNTRIES IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC
Project Director:          Exaltacion E. Lamberte
Funding Agency:        World Bank through Global Forum for Health Research

The Mapping of Mental Health Research in Low- and Middle-Income Countries study, funded by the Global Forum for Health Research and the World Bank, generally aimed to develop a regional map of actors and their respective roles in the domains of mental, neurological and behavioral health research, and to describe the current research agenda and the process of priority setting in a Domain Profile. Specifically, the project intended to: 1) map the actors involved in mental health research, particularly in the Western Pacific Region, 2) map the research agenda as well as the domain of the studies done on mental health, 3) describe the process of priority setting, and 4) analyze the factors that impact on mental, neurological and behavioral health policy.

This project sought to produce a network of institutions and individuals working on research on mental and neurological disorders in low- and middle-income countries and their priority setting strategies.

To attain the first objective, the following methodologies were employed in the mapping of actors in the region: (a) searching for mental health-related articles in various publication databases, taking note of the primary authors and their contact details, (b) identifying actors through organizations/associations, and (c) snowball sampling of stakeholders. The second and fourth research objectives were achieved through the sending of questionnaires to the local researchers and other stakeholders identified through the mapping of actors. Self-administered questionnaires were sent to different stakeholders, namely: (a) researchers, (b) ministry officials, (c) university administrators, and (d) members of associations/organizations.

Key words: mental health research, neurological disorders, low- and middle-income countries, Western Pacific Region

 

PILOT TESTING OF MONITORING AND EVALUATION TOOLS FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT UNIT (LGU) PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT IN HEALTH SYSTEMS
Project Director:     Exaltacion E. Lamberte (Team Leader and Director)
Funding Agency:    World Health Organization/Department of Health–Bureau of Health Planning and Policy Development

The project had the overall aim of developing a coherent and consistent system of Local Government Unit performance assessment for local health systems. The research initiative had two phases: Phase 1, which centered on the development of the composite domains and indicators of each component identified in the WHO framework, and Phase 2, which entailed the conduct of the pilot testing activity and fine-tuning of operational definitions of the composite domains and the reduction of indicators to make it easier to manage in local areas. The objectives of Phase 1 were as follows: a) to develop a framework that would be suitable for assessment of local health systems comparable across time and across LGUs; b) to identify possible indicators that may be suitable within the different components of the developed framework; c) to analyze the possibility of and issues involved in developing one or more composite indexes of relevant indicators; d) to develop tools and instruments to collect and report relevant data  for selection and pilot-testing at the community level; e) to develop a consultation plan on the framework for the Department of Health; and f) to identify key issues and strategies that need to be considered in order to effectively operationalize the system.

Phase 2 aimed, in particular, to: a) review and conduct the assessment in three provinces and cities; b) reduce and finalize parsimonious listing of parameters, indicators and measures appropriate for the assessment of LGUs; c) determine the acceptability of the parameters and indicators among stakeholders, LGU officials and health managers; d) design and refine data collection forms, tools, and the various  strategies for data collection; e) design and refine the reporting forms, publication formats and other tools for effective performance assessment; f) establish a feasible method of recording, analyzing and reporting the data; g) identify the roles of responsible units or involved stakeholders; and h) identify strategies to operationalize and maintain the system.

The pilot sites included some municipalities/component cities of the provinces of La Union, Cavite, Negros Oriental and Bukidnon. The chartered cities of Cebu, Pasay and Cagayan de Oro were also covered.

Key words: LGU performance assessment, local health systems, Department of Health, pilot-testing activity

 

DOCUMENTATION OF THE INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS IN GOVERNANCE EXPERIENCES IN THE PHILIPPINES
Project Director:          Marlon DL. Era
Funding Agency:        Japan Foundation (through Local Government Academy)

With the rapid development of modern knowledge, preserving indigenous knowledge systems faces various challenges. First, indigenous knowledge has not been captured, documented, and stored in a systematic way. Second, there is an information gap on how to include indigenous knowledge in modern development planning processes. Third, most development interventions have failed to convince indigenous people to participate because of the absence of instruments and mechanisms that can enable them to use their own knowledge. To address these challenges, greater efforts must be undertaken to mainstream indigenous knowledge systems in development program.

This study basically focused on local governance practices of cultural communities, specifically in the Autonomous Region for Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) and the Cordillera Autonomous Region (CAR). It also examines the state of indigenous knowledge systems in the Philippines. The main objective of the project has been to document and analyze indigenous knowledge systems in local governance. Specifically, it aimed to 1) draw out, understand, and appreciate indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) in promoting good local governance in countries of the Asia Pacific Region; and 2) develop a framework for mainstreaming indigenous knowledge systems (IKA) in a modern form of local governance (e.g. Decentralization).

The findings of the study were presented in a regional conference in Manila organized by the Local Government Academy.

Key words: Indigenous knowledge, information gaps, development planning, local governance

 

THE INTEGRATION OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ISSUES IN THE NURSING CURRICULUM: EFFECTS OF THE USE OF TEACHERS’ GUIDES AND STUDENT LEARNING MODULES ON THE FACULTY AND STUDENTS IN SELECTED NURSING COLLEGES IN LUZON AND THE VISAYAS
Project Director:      Pilar Ramos-Jimenez
Funding Agency:    Social Development Research Center (SDRC)         

The integration of domestic violence issues into the nursing curriculum of Silliman University was a pilot project that was initiated from 1997 to 2000 by the DLSU-SDRC Task Force on Social Science & Reproductive Health (TFSSRH), a small group composed of health professionals and social scientists, a lawyer, and representatives of women’s organizations.

The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of the use of the student learning modules and teachers’ guides on the faculty and students of five nursing schools (two in Luzon, two in the Visayas, and one in Mindanao) that participated in the June 2002 training at Silliman University.  Specifically, the study examined the (a) status, strategies and processes adopted  by the nursing schools in utilizing the learning tools, (b) the faculty and students’ perceived beneficial effects and difficulties using the foregoing tools, (c) the strategies used by the faculty to overcome their difficulties,  (d) indicators used by the nursing schools to assess the competencies of their graduates, and (e) sustainability and prospects of the continued use of the integrated tools in the selected nursing institutions.  Key informant interviews with school administrators and focus group discussion with faculty and students were the main methods used in the study.  The coordinator of the Mindanao Working Group on Reproductive Health, gender and sexuality, a consortium of tertiary academic institutions on the island, was interviewed because of the current effort of the working group in training new nursing colleges in the use of the learning tools in partnership with Silliman University’s faculty-writers.

The findings of the study showed that only Silliman University’s College of Nursing— the pilot institution—completely utilized the student learning modules and teachers’ guides.  Two nursing schools partially used some learning tools in selected subjects. The other two schools used them mainly as references.  One of these schools developed its own psychology module incorporating domestic violence issues, while the other shifted to a problem-based learning approach.

Key words: Silliman University College of Nursing, domestic violence, student learning modules, reproductive health, gender and sexuality

 

FORGING PARTNERSHIPS IN ADVOCACY FOR FAMILY PLANNING: THE SOCIAL ACCEPTANCE PROJECT ON FAMILY PLANNING, PARTNERSHIP, ENGAGEMENT AND ADVOCACY (TSAP) STORIES IN THE FIELD
Project Director:          Pilar Ramos-Jimenez
Funding Agency:        Academy for Educational Development (AED)

Since the first quarter of 2003, active partnership activities in the promotion and practice of family planning have been undertaken with major organizations in the country by  TSAP-FP (The Social Acceptance Project on Family Planning, Partnership, Engagement and Advocacy), with the  AED as primary contractor, particularly its  Advocacy and Social Mobilization (ASM) unit. To determine the status of the foregoing partnership from January 2003 to July 2004, a qualitative study  was undertaken particularly about the (a)  processes and strategies used by  TSAP-FP to engage its partners in family planning advocacy, (b) the perceived  factors  that  have facilitated and  hindered the partnership as well as the  strategies the  partners utilized to manage their difficulties, (c) the advocacy efforts undertaken by the partners within their respective constituencies and target communities, (d) the lessons learned by the partners from the collaboration with TSAP-FP, and (e) the challenges confronting the partners, including the sustainability of the FP advocacy.

The major lessons obtained from the partnership focused on the effects of the training workshops on the leaders and their organizations. These training activities have enlightened the leaders about the need to practice FP, especially among the members of their organizations.

Recommendations of the study suggest that TSAP should support the new indigenous networks, examine the partners’ organizational structures and management system, and conduct a review of current USAID/AED administrative policies in supporting local training workshops/seminars and documentation of the strategies and processes that will be utilized by the partners and their new networks/groups.

Key words: Family planning, advocacy and social mobilization, training workshops, management systems

 



 

 

 

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