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BFAD ASSESSMENT AND INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF THE CLIENT FEEDBACK AND MONITORING SYSTEM
Team Leader:              Exaltacion Lamberte
Funding Agency:        Health Policy Development and Planning Bureau, Department of Health

The main objective of the study was to institutionalize the BFAD Client Monitoring and Feedback System based on the Service Quality Model that was used in the SDRC 2003 BFAD Client Satisfaction Study.

The study’s major tasks were to: 1) conduct an assessment of the readiness, capacities and resources of BFAD to implement the Service Quality Model-based Client Feedback Monitoring System, which was formulated and used in the 2003 SDRC study; 2) assist BFAD in the implementation of the client feedback and monitoring system using the tools, systems, and mechanisms developed by SDRC in the 2003 study, to include a second client satisfaction survey in the BFAD Central Office in 2007, with BFAD taking on the major role in carrying out the survey, from data collection to documentation and analysis of the survey outcome; 3) assist BFAD in conducting a comparative analysis of the level of its Central Office clients’ satisfaction, based on the 2003 and 2007 survey studies; 4) support BFAD in the conduct of its client feedback research dissemination and utilization activities, action planning, and service delivery improvement strategic planning; 5) document the processes of implementation and standard operating procedures of the client feedback and monitoring system in an Implementation Manual and make the report available for dissemination; 6) conduct training for the BFAD teams that will implement the Client Feedback Monitoring System; and 7) participate or act as resource persons in research and policy deliberations dealing directly with the outputs and outcomes of the project.

Prospects and Recommendations. Based on the findings revealed in the study, the prospects of making CFMS fully institutionalized and fully operational remain bright, given the involvement and enthusiasm of the BFAD personnel who attended the project’s capacity building activities. Commitment toward the mission of CFMS has been made by the individual staff and officers; in addition, clear charting of responsibilities in relation to the tasks involved has been done. Steps were recommended to forward and advance the initiatives related to the institutionalization of the CFMS.

Key words: client monitoring and feedback, service quality, research dissemination and utilization, Bureau of Food and Drugs

 

MICRO LEVEL SUBAYBAY BATA INITIATIVE: A FRAMEWORK AND INDICATORS SYSTEM
Team Leader:              Exaltacion Lamberte
Funding Agency:        Council for the Welfare of Children

The research aimed to develop a monitoring and evaluation framework for the SBMS with focus on the micro level, that is, at the levels of the local government units, barangays, and households and/or families.  It had two-pronged general objectives: (a) to undertake a mapping of indicators and the existing monitoring and evaluation systems in selected local government units and organizations/agencies working closely with children; and (b) to formulate an appropriate and suitable framework for the local monitoring system for children, including the identification of indicators and measures of well-being.

The review of the monitoring and evaluation (M & E) systems in the LGUs and selected organizations involved in the task of realizing children’s rights and well-being indicated a promising situation in that the agencies and organizations covered in the study already have the tradition of monitoring their programs and activities, including resources. This, however, needs strengthening such that the monitoring system does not remain in the realm of the information unit maintaining the data base or in the organization itself, but rather something in which results are utilized, analyzed, and disseminated for project management strategic planning, identification of gaps for corrective action, and finally, public dissemination of valuable information.

Key words:  children’s rights and well-being, monitoring and evaluation systems, local government units, corrective action, information dissemination

 

SYSTEM PRESIDENT’S POVERTY ALLEVIATION: ACTION RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION FOR PEOPLES’ ORGANIZATIONS MICROFINANCE INITIATIVE (PHASE 2)
Project Director:          Jesusa M. Marco
Funding Agency:        DLSU President's Office and SDRC Poverty Studies Fund

Phase II primarily includes the following activities: (1) Continued monitoring and formative evaluation of the micro-finance project in Singalong implemented by COSCA; (2) Skills Inventory Survey in the community; and (3) Dissemination of the results and mapping out future directions.

Key words: Poverty alleviation, micro-finance projects

 

THE 3rd ASIAN REGIONAL WORKSHOP OF THE HIV/AIDS AND STI KNOWLEDGE  PROGRAM
Project Director:      Jesusa M. Marco
Funding Agency:    Department for International Development-Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

After two regional workshops (in 2003 and 2004), the Asia HIV/AIDS Research for Action Network (AHARAN) convened the 3rd Asian Regional Workshop of the HIV/AIDS and STI Knowledge Programme from November 18 to 20, 2005 in Shanghai, China.

In pursuit of the network’s over-riding goal to eventually provide a venue for collaboration among the six member countries—Cambodia, Vietnam, India, Thailand, China and the Philippines—, the Workshop specifically aimed to: a) describe Best Practices on HIV/AIDS in each country; b) review government initiatives related to the Millennium Development Goals specific to HIV/AIDS and their integration in the Information Monitoring System; c) identify and prioritize common concerns or issues for which research is necessary; and d) develop a feasible regional research proposal.

The 2005 workshop was jointly organized by the Social Development Research Center – De La Salle University (Manila) and the Shanghai Institute for Planned Parenthood Research (SIPPR), with funding support from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine through the DfID Knowledge Programme.

Key words: HIV/AIDS, best practices, Millennium Development Goals, information monitoring systems

 

AGROFORESTRY AND SUSTAINABLE VEGETABLE PRODUCTION IN SEA WATERSHEDS: MARKET AND GENDER COMPONENTS OF TMPEGS PHILIPPINES
Principal Collaborating Scientist:        Ma. Elena Chiong-Javier
Funding Agency:     US Agency for International Development through the Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management Collaborative Research and Support Program (USAID-SANREM-CRSP) of the Office of International Research, Education, and Development (OIRED) at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

In general, the project seeks to reduce poverty, food scarcity, and environmental degradation in the region by combining economically-viable and resource-conserving technologies and gender friendly socio-economic policies that will benefit and reward stakeholders in a watershed, especially small scale women and men farmers. The project has specific objectives on SANREM technology, marketing, policy, environmental and socioeconomic impacts, gender, and scaling-up (TMPEGS). Different studies to realize each of these objectives are simultaneously and sequentially being conducted primarily by collaborating institutions in the three countries with inputs from technical experts from western academic institutions and international research centers. In the Philippine case, the market and gender studies were assigned to SDRC.

The market study aims to conduct market value chain research at the local, regional, and national levels that builds upon existing market strategies and develop interventions to overcome constraints and take advantage of opportunities. On the other hand, the gender component aims to provide mechanisms to improve the socio-economic well-being of women engaged in vegetable production and agroforestry enterprises, especially in terms of income and labor share, and to involve women in decisions that concern their welfare.

Key words: Southeast Asian watersheds, small-scale women and men farmers, market value chain research, vegetable production and agroforestry enterprises

 

PATHS TO SOCIAL INTEGRATION AND PARTICIPATION FOR THE YOUTH IN THE PHILIPPINES AND IN ASIA
Project Director:          Madelene Sta. Maria
Funding Agency:        SDRC Fund

Conducted by faculty members together with students in the graduate program of the Department of Psychology, the project has the following objectives: 1) to develop a data-base on youth capacities and resources as agents in social development by determining the opportunities and constraints experienced by the Filipino youth and other youth in Asia, in contexts of development such as family relationships, the school, the community, and at work; and 2) to develop a values inventory based on youth experiences in changing contexts of development.

The research project covers a total of seven research initiatives, and is being conducted for a period of one year. Within the given year, five out of the seven initiatives were undertaken, namely: 1) Youth life in the school setting; 2) Youth political socialization and civic engagement; 3) Youth and mental health; 4) Youth and peer relationships; and 5) Youth in the changing Filipino family.

For each project initiative, detailed tasks were conducted. These are composed of: 1) A review of the relevant literature, undertaken on the experiences of Filipino adolescents in specific contexts of development; 2) a focus groups guide, constructed based on the relevant literature for each of the developmental contexts; 3) focus groups conducted among youth groups—at least two focus groups will be conducted with rural youth, and at least two focus groups will be conducted with urban youth; 4) a qualitative analysis of the discussions in each of these groups; and 5) the construction of items for the survey instruments, based on important themes that emerge from the analysis of focus group discussions.

Key words: youth capacities and resources, values inventory, family relationships, Filipino family, mental health

 

WORKSHOP/SYMPOSIUM ON “INFECTIOUS DISEASES AMONG CHILDREN IN CONFLICT SITUATIONS: RISK, RESILIENCE AND RESPONSE”
Project Director:          Pilar Ramos-Jimenez
Funding Agency:        World Health Organization

SDRC, together with the UNICEF/UNDP/World Bank/World Health Organization Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), particularly its Steering Committee of the Strategic Social, Economic and Behavioral (SEB) Research in Geneva, Switzerland, conducted an international symposium/workshop entitled “Infectious Diseases Among Children in Conflict Situations: Risk, Resilience and Response” from  January 9 to 13, 2006 at the CSB Hotel of the Angelo King International Conference Center. This activity was organized in collaboration with the School of Public Health and Community Medicine of the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Australia, and the Refugee Studies Center (RSC) of the Department of International Development, University of Oxford.

The symposium/workshop aimed to present the state of the art in relation to child engagement and child participation in conflict, document key challenges to the field, and identify strategies to address these challenges.  To accomplish the foregoing objectives, the workshop/symposium: (1) brought together researchers, service-providers, and international experts  to share their valuable insights and experiences in research and service-delivery in the field; (2) presented and explored current thinking with respect to innovative research work with children and the challenges of tackling infectious diseases in conflict settings; (3) drew on experiences of participants of selected countries to describe the factors affecting health and infectious diseases risk, resilience and response in conflict; (4) promoted new thinking around child-centered approaches to research and infectious disease; and (5) supported the application of the insights derived to designing innovative child-centered research projects  in the selected countries in conflict. 

Participants attending the symposium/workshop were from Uganda, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Indonesia, and the Philippines.  Co-convenors of the international symposium/workshop were Dr. Pilar Ramos-Jimenez, SDRC Research Fellow and Associate Professor of the Behavioral Sciences Department, and currently co-chair of the TDR-SEB Steering Committee; Dr. Anthony Zwi, Professor and Head of the UNSW School of Public Health and Community Medicine, and member, TDR-SEB Steering Committee; and Dr. Johannes Ulrich Sommerfeld, TDR-SEB Steering Committee Manager.

Key words: research work with children, infectious diseases in conflict settings

 



 

 

 

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