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EVALUATION OF THE PROCESS AND IMPACT OF PCP II IMPLEMENTATION IN TEN LOCAL CHURCHES IN THE PHILIPPINES (PHASE 1)
Project Director:   Dr. Ferdinand D. Dagmang
Funding Agency:   Missio Munich

The project is an assessment of the process and impact of the implementation of the Second Plenary Council of the Philippines (PCP II) in ten local churches, and is the first national assessment of church programs/activities in relation to PCP II implementation to be conducted in 20 years. The study attempts to provide a scientific evaluation and assessment of impact of the practices/procedures on church life by uncovering concrete development and/or non-development of the pastoral/BEC (Basic Ecclesial Communities) priorities in line with PCP II decrees.

The PCP II study is divided into three stages: The first stage involved two pilot studies of the processes and impact of programs/activities carried out in one rural-based parish (Gumaca, Quezon) and one urban-based parish (the Parish of Our Lady of the Abandoned (POLA) in Hulo, Mandaluyong, Metro Manila). The second stage involved the evaluation of the Diocese of Cavite’s programs/activities implemented in two of its selected parishes. The third stage is a nationalization of the study, with one parish in Boac, Marinduque, two parishes in the Visayas (Iloilo and a Franciscan parish in Cebu City), and three parishes in Mindanao (Pagadian, Marbel, and a parish of the Archdiocese of Davao).

The team consulted several social scientists and theologians after the completion of the analysis of field data.

Key words: Second Plenary Council of the Philippines (PCP II), Basic Ecclesial Communities (BEC), church life, rural-based and urban-based parish

 

SEEDS OF CHANGE 30/15 BEING POOR AND BECOMING NON-POOR: PERSPECTIVES, EVIDENCE AND INSIGHTS
Project Director:    Dr. Exaltacion E. Lamberte
Funding Agency:    East Asian Development Network (EADN)

From a social science perspective, the research, using evidence gathered from different surveys and case studies, attempts to portray and provide an account of poverty from a multi-dimensional perspective. It also deals with poverty dynamics as experienced by individuals and families living in depressed areas of Philippine cities.  It depicts the features and magnitude of poverty, not only in terms of its commonplace measure, income, but also those non-income dimensions of deprivation.
Adopting a multi-dimensional perspective of the concept of poverty, a description of the varying facets of poverty is provided, specifically of:

  • income and other monetary measures;
  • health;
  • education;
  • security; and
  • social inclusion

The volume also gives a small picture of how poor people view their life, how they look at poverty, how they characterize the features of poor individuals as well as community, and the perceived life essentials for enduring and exiting poverty. Moreover, the material generates a discussion on the conditions of selected vulnerable sectors in urban areas, namely the children of families living at the low end, and informal settlers.

Key words: poverty dynamics, Philippine cities, non-income measures, vulnerable sectors

 

AGROFORESTRY BOOK PUBLICATION “HOLDING THEIR OWN: SMALLHOLDER PRODUCTION, MARKETING AND WOMEN ISSUES IN PHILIPPINE AGROFORESTRY”
Project Director:    Dr. Ma. Elena Chiong-Javier
Funding Agency:  US Agency for International Development through the Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management Collaborative Research and Support Program (USAID-SANREM-CRSP) of the Office of International Research, Education, and Development (OIRED) at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

In general, the project has sought to reduce poverty, food scarcity, and environmental degradation in the region by combining economically-viable and resource-conserving technologies and gender friendly socio-economic policies that will benefit and reward stakeholders in a watershed, especially small scale women and men farmers. It is hypothesized that “integrating vegetable production in the agroforestry system on small farms will help to alleviate poverty and enhance environmental protection, sustainability, and ecosystem biodiversity in SEA watersheds and vice versa.” The project has specific objectives on SANREM technology, marketing, policy, environmental and socioeconomic impacts, gender, and scaling-up (TMPEGS). Different studies to realize each of these objectives are simultaneously and sequentially being conducted primarily by collaborating institutions in the three countries with inputs from technical experts from western academic institutions and international research centers. In the Philippine case, the market and gender studies were assigned to SDRC.

The project has produced a book entitled Holding Their Own: Smallholder Production, Marketing and Women Issues in the Philippines. The book contains six pieces whose coverage includes vegetable-agroforestry intervention, the dualistic vegetable supply chain, farm women’s market participation, vermicomposting, and health consequences experienced by women in agriculture in the Philippines.According to the Foreword written by biological engineer Manuel R. Reyes, through the book Dr. Javier “shows the detrimental impacts of agricultural production practices in rural women, such as exposure to harmful chemicals especially when pregnant, use of machines designed for men, nutritional deficiencies due to poverty and overwork, and farm-related accidents and injuries. She offers an example of a women-friendly production technology deliberately researched and developed for women, which is vermiculture. Afterwards she shows how effective and gifted women are in marketing vegetables, advocating that women must be provided by government and society with avenues like post-harvest infrastructure and training, organized market information, better transport facilities to effectively market vegetables, and market policies redesigned with a bias to and for women. Small-scale marketing must be redesigned for women and be a means to empower women in rural communities.”

Key words: agroforestry; SEA watersheds; vermiculture; technology, marketing, policy, environmental and socioeconomic impacts, gender, and scaling-up (TMPEGS)

 

ECO-BIO-SOCIAL FACTORS OF VECTOR DENSITY IN DEVELOPING AN EFFECTIVE APPROACH TO DENGUE CONTROL IN THE PHILIPPINES (Phase 2)
Project Director:   Dr. Jesusa M. Marco
Funding Agency:   World Health Organization/TDR

The second phase of the study seeks to determine process, progress and outcome indicators of community-based ecosystem management strategies at the household, cluster, barangay and city levels; and to determine and evaluate the differences in the processes of setting up the community-based strategies at the household and cluster levels of four selected clusters. The project resumed towards the latter part of May 2009 with a series of meetings with the community stakeholders. Since Phase 1 of the project ended around the 3rd quarter of 2008, the aforementioned meetings consisted of project updates and a presentation of Phase 2 plans and activities with members of the City Health Office, Health Center staff of the selected barangays (Brgy. Putatan, Alabang, and Cupang), as well as representatives from the City Mayor’s office and City departments. In the succeeding meetings, an orientation and planning workshop was conducted. In these workshops, specific instructions were given as to the implementation of the intervention in the four cluster sites, namely Manggahan, Mutual Homes, San Jose and Intercity with the former being a high-density cluster, and the latter three, low-density clusters. Before the implementation, the Project Team (referring to the staff from DLSU and RITM) together with the Health Center physician, sanitary inspectors, and barangay health workers, oriented the 100 households from each of the cluster sites as to the vector, disease, and the intervention package, which differed for each cluster.

Key words: community-based ecosystem management strategies, community stakeholders, intervention packages


 

 

 

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